Reviews

On Yarn Bombing: The Art of Crochet and Knit Graffiti

An inspiring and unforgettable look at the world of knit graffiti and the creative folks behind it, Yarn Bombing deserves a place on any hip crafter’s bookshelf.
—Debbie Stoller, editor-in-chief of BUST Magazine and author of the Stitch ‘n Bitch books

Great photos, stories, and instructions.
Utne Reader

Yarn Bombing extends Stitch ‘n’ Bitch’s approach to knitting, appealing to hipster knitters with attractive photography and irreverent patterns, reclaiming knitting as an act that is both feminist and anarchic.
Quill and Quire

Yarn Bombing really strives to give readers a full window into this growing movement…. No stone is left unturned (or without a cozy) in this comprehensive book.
—Craftzine.com

Mandy Moore and Leanne Prain have written the definitive guidebook—published by Vancouver’s fabulous Arsenal Pulp Press—to covert textile street art…. The kick-ass DIY patterns ensure that your attempts at transforming your own locale will move well beyond your grandma’s tea cosy.
The Georgia Straight

There are photos on every page that will keep you entertained…. [some] are quite impressive, like a pink crocheted army tank cozy. My favourite is “The Hare,” a 200-foot-long pink bunny by Vienna-based art collective Gelatin, stuffed with straw and completely knitted with wool.
Montreal Mirror

The book is beautifully put together and offers a history of yarn graffiti, as well as how to start your own projects, and patterns. I didn’t realize how much of a movement was going on with yarn bombing. I’ve been thinking about trying it for a long time and this book may have just given me that extra inspiration (along with great tutorials).
—OffTheHooks (craftyash.blogspot.com)

With a part-instructional new Canadian book released in September and winter on the way, guerrilla knitting seems likely to spread. (After all, poles need sweaters, too.) In Yarn Bombing: The Art of Crochet and Knit Graffiti, Vancouver authors Leanne Prain and Mandy Moore trace the whimsical movement back to an Austin, Texas, crew called Knitta Please, who tagged a doorknob in Houston in 2005 and spurred a “knit-graffiti revolution” that spread across the blogosphere and around the world.
Toronto Star

In Yarn Bombing, beautiful full-page photos illustrate the unique visual balance of street art and traditional stitching…. After reading it you may well be inspired to pick up your needles or obtain your first crochet hook: Novices are welcome, and full chapters are devoted to tutorials.
Bitch

Yarn Bombing is not just a history of the movement, but a how-to guide for aspiring yarn bombers themselves…. [It's] a good reminder that craft, yarn-based or otherwise, is as legitimate a form of expression as any other medium.
Maisonneuve

[Yarn Bombing] has the perfect mix of technical proficiency, humour, and dedicated artistry that makes knitting communities so popular…. There’s something here for everyone.
subTerrain

On Hoopla: The Art of Unexpected Embroidery

Proving there’s much more to stitching than flower patterns, Hoopla inspires creative activism by presenting the art of embroidery through critical lenses of gender, class, and culture. Radical artists, take note: here’s a new challenge for you.
—Julia Horel-O’Brien, Shameless magazine

With hilarious DIY projects, like needlepoint nipple doilies, Hoopla proves that there’s a place in every woman’s heart (and wardrobe) for some cheeky thread work.
—Elle

Prain’s admiration for and fascination with the work of embroiderers shines in this visual and thoughtful collection of interviews and instructional guides.
Plaid Magazine

It presents embroidery as a bright, bold, smart and sophisticated art form. Just as promised, Hoopla is a craft book with attitude.
—Canada Arts Connect

Prain (co-author of Yarn Bombing) offers out-of-the-ordinary designs, starched with humor. Informative and inspirational interviews with embroiderers prove they don’t sew like their grannies. But Grandmother would approve of the practical sections – on history, tools from needles to the humble thimble, types of embroidery, and finishing techniques.
Publishers Weekly

This book is filled with a wide range of approaches to the craft – from making and embellishing useful items to creating statements … Hoopla is a project book in that there are projects to try. But mostly, it’s a statement book, a primer on stitchery’s many possibilities, and a big dose of inspiration.
—CraftyPod

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