DIY, DIY Ideas, Events, Hoopla, Workshop

How to embroider on paper

Rob and Andrea, the masterminds behind Got Craft?, invited me to participate in this year’s Got Craft? Holiday fair which took place at the Croatian Cultural Centre in East Vancouver this past weekend. Since the workshop was a drop-in affair, I created a simple and fun craft project inspired by the Photo Feelism project in Hoopla: The Art of Unexpected Embroidery, which instructs readers how to stitch on photographic paper.

I used my Print Gocco to silkscreen 100 die-cut cards that I bought from an art store. I chose simple fonts in a medium weight, and gave one card a simple snowflake and the other a few little stars. Workshops participants were asked to embellish the simple designs however they wanted – they could trace the silk-screened artwork or draw around the design. My good friend Mary Alice Elcock (of the preserving blog Plan to Can) was there to help me by taking photos and showing participants how to make french knots, her favourite stitch.

Here are some blurry iphone photos of the weekend:

Emily Smith, one of the main organizers of MakerFaire Vancouver, made a card even though she’d been up all night felting an LED sign for the MakerFaire booth. Yes, you read that right, FELTING an LED sign. Emily is amazing.

Artist Rachael Ashe‘s freeform interpretation.

If you’d like to try this project on your own, any piece of card will do. Recycle a Christmas card or use an old photograph.

A few tips for stitching on paper, photographs, or cardstock:

1. Pre-punch your stitch pattern on the card with your needle before threading it. This makes pulling your thread and needle through the card much easier.

2. Use a thimble to protect your fingers. Cardstock is more rigid than fabric, therefore your needle will require a stronger push, which a thimble can provide

3. If you try and make your stitches appear close together (as in a backstitch), make use of the holes already made from the other stitches. Too many holes close together in your card will cause the paper to tear

4. Always knot your floss when you start so you don’t pull the thread out of the paper.

5. Divide your floss in half so that it consists of three threads (commercial floss comes in six strands to make up the larger thread). This will make it easier to work with.

6. Choose a sturdy needle. I like crewel needles for this kind of project.

7. Don’t forget to have fun!

 

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